HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Dharma
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
[...More...]

"Dharma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

THEMIS
Astraea PrometheusParents Uranus and GaiaSiblingsTitansCrius Cronus Coeus Hyperion Iapetus Oceanus Mnemosyne Phoebe Rhea Tethys TheiaHekatonkheiresBriareos Cottus GygesCyclopsArges Brontes SteropesOther siblingsGigantes Erinyes
Erinyes
(the Furies) MeliaeHalf-siblingsAphrodite Typhon Python Uranus Themis
Themis
(/ˈθiːmɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέμις) is an ancient Greek Titaness. She is described as "[the Lady] of good counsel", and is the personification of divine order, fairness, law, natural law, and custom. Her symbols are the Scales of Justice, tools used to remain balanced and pragmatic
[...More...]

"THEMIS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maat
Maat
Maat
or Ma'at (Egyptian m3ˤt)[1] refers to the ancient Egyptian concepts of truth, balance, order, harmony, law, morality, and justice
[...More...]

"Maat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sikh
A Sikh
Sikh
(/siːk, sɪk/; Punjabi: ਸਿੱਖ sikkh [sɪkkʰ]) is a person associated with the Sikh
Sikh
nation, sharing a common history, culture, language (Punjabi) and panentheistic religion
[...More...]

"Sikh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vedic Sanskrit
Vedic Sanskrit
Sanskrit
or Aryam (Devanagari: आर्यम् IAST: āryam, "noble") is an Indo-European language, more specifically one branch of the Indo-Iranian group. It is the ancient language of the Vedas
Vedas
of Hinduism, texts compiled over the period of the mid-2nd to mid-1st millennium BCE.[1] It was orally preserved, predating the advent of Brahmi script
Brahmi script
by several centuries
[...More...]

"Vedic Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phenomena
A phenomenon (Greek: φαινόμενον, phainómenon, from the verb phainein, to show, shine, appear, to be manifest or manifest itself, plural phenomena)[1] is any thing which manifests itself. Phenomena are often, but not always, understood as "things that appear" or "experiences" for a sentient being, or in principle may be so. The term came into its modern philosophical usage through Immanuel Kant, who contrasted it with the noumenon. In contrast to a phenomenon, a noumenon cannot be directly observed. Kant was heavily influenced by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
in this part of his philosophy, in which phenomenon and noumenon serve as interrelated technical terms. Far predating this, the ancient Greek Pyrrhonist philosopher Sextus Empiricus
Sextus Empiricus
also used phenomenon and noumenon as interrelated technical terms. Cloud chamber
Cloud chamber
phenomena
[...More...]

"Phenomena" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proto-Indo-European Language
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]

"Proto-Indo-European Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Untranslatability
Untranslatability
Untranslatability
is a property of a text, or of any utterance, in one language, for which no equivalent text or utterance can be found in another language when translated. Terms are, however, neither exclusively translatable nor exclusively untranslatable; rather, the degree of difficulty of translation depends on their nature, as well as on the translator's knowledge of the languages in question. Quite often, a text or utterance that is considered to be "untranslatable" is actually a lacuna, or lexical gap. That is, there is no one-to-one equivalence between the word, expression or turn of phrase in the source language and another word, expression or turn of phrase in the target language. A translator can, however, resort to a number of translation procedures to compensate for this
[...More...]

"Untranslatability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Avestan Language
Avestan
Avestan
/əˈvɛstən/,[2] also known historically as Zend, is a language known only from its use as the language of Zoroastrian scripture (the Avesta), from which it derives its name. The language is classified as an Iranian language, a branch of the Indo-Iranian languages within the Indo-European family
[...More...]

"Avestan Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Church Slavonic
Old Church Slavonic
Church Slavonic
(/sləˈvɒnɪk/, /slæˈ-/),[2] also known as Old Church Slavic (/ˈslɑːvɪk, ˈslæv-/;[2][3] or Ancient/Old Slavonic often abbreviated to OCS; (autonym словѣ́ньскъ ѩꙁꙑ́къ, slověnĭskŭ językŭ), not to be confused with the Proto-Slavic, was the first Slavic literary language. The 9th-century Byzantine missionaries Saints Cyril an
[...More...]

"Old Church Slavonic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aramaic Language
Aramaic[2] (אַרָמָיָא Arāmāyā, Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܝܐ‎, Arabic: آرامية‎) is a language or group of languages belonging to the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic language family. More specifically, it is part of the Northwest Semitic group, which also includes the Canaanite languages such as Hebrew and Phoenician. The Aramaic alphabet
Aramaic alphabet
was widely adopted for other languages and is ancestral to the Hebrew, Syriac and Arabic alphabets. During its approximately 3,100 years of written history,[3] Aramaic has served variously as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship, religious study and as the spoken tongue of a number of Semitic peoples from the Near East. Historically, Aramaic was the language of Aramean tribes, a Semitic people of the region around between the Levant
Levant
and the northern Euphrates
Euphrates
valley
[...More...]

"Aramaic Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Devanāgarī
Devanagari
Devanagari
(/ˌdeɪvəˈnɑːɡəri/ DAY-və-NAH-gə-ree; देवनागरी, IAST: Devanāgarī, a compound of "deva" दे
and "nāgarī" नागरी; Hindi
Hindi
pronunciation: [d̪eːʋˈnaːɡri]), also called Nagari (Nāgarī, नागरी),[5] is an abugida (alphasyllabary) used in India
India
and Nepal
[...More...]

"Devanāgarī" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Karl Friedrich Geldner
Karl Friedrich Geldner (17 December 1852 – 5 February 1929) was a German linguist best known for his analysis and synthesis of Avestan and Vedic Sanskrit texts.Contents1 Biography 2 Academic achievements 3 Select bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Geldner was born in Saalfeld, Saxe-Meiningen, where his father was a Protestant clergyman. Geldner studied Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Avestan
Avestan
at the University of Leipzig
University of Leipzig
in 1871 before moving to the University of Tübingen
University of Tübingen
in 1872. He received a doctorate in Indological studies in 1875, and became a privatdozent following his habilitation in 1876
[...More...]

"Karl Friedrich Geldner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Romanization Of Sanskrit
There are several methods of transliteration from Devanāgarī
Devanāgarī
to the Roman script (a process known as romanization) which share similarities, although no single system of transliteration has emerged[dubious – discuss] as the standard.[1] This process has been termed Romanagari, a portmanteau of the words Roman and Devanagari, a slang word used particularly by bloggers to describe the romanization of Hindi
[...More...]

"Romanization Of Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Me (mythology)
In Sumerian mythology, a me (𒈨; Sumerian: me; Akkadian: paršu) is one of the decrees of the gods that is foundational to those social institutions, religious practices, technologies, behaviors, mores, and human conditions that make civilization, as the Sumerians understood it, possible. They are fundamental to the Sumerian understanding of the relationship between humanity and the gods.Contents1 Mythological origin and nature 2 List of mes 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksMythological origin and nature[edit] The mes were originally collected by Enlil
Enlil
and then handed over to the guardianship of Enki, who was to broker them out to the various Sumerian centers, beginning with his own city of Eridu
Eridu
and continuing with Ur, Meluhha, and Dilmun
[...More...]

"Me (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.