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Elizabeth Of Ladymead
Elizabeth of Ladymead
Elizabeth of Ladymead
is a 1948 British drama film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Neagle, Hugh Williams, Isabel Jeans
Isabel Jeans
and Bernard Lee.[2] It charts the life of a British family between 1854 and 1945 and their involvement in four wars - the Crimean War, Boer War, First World War
First World War
and Second World War.[3][4] The drama was remade by the BBC as a TV production in 1949, with Patricia Burke
Patricia Burke
as Elizabeth, John Robinson as John Beresford and Cathleen Nesbitt
Cathleen Nesbitt
as Mother.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Critical reception 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] Four generations of women (all played by Anna Neagle
Anna Neagle
in the film) have lived in Ladymead, a Georgian Mansion, while their husbands are away at war
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Leonard Maltin
Leonard Michael Maltin (born December 18, 1950) is an American film critic and historian, as well as an author of several mainstream books on cinema, focusing on nostalgic, celebratory narratives. He is known as a "go-to" critic for the major studios, for writing the shortest review in the U.S. for Isn't It Romantic? and for creating the Walt Disney Treasures series.Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 Popular culture appearances 4 Bibliography4.1 As author 4.2 As editor 4.3 As a host5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPersonal life[edit] Maltin was born in New York City, son of singer Jacqueline (née Gould; 1923–2012), and Aaron Isaac Maltin (1915–2002), a lawyer and immigration judge.[1] He is married to researcher and producer Alice Tlusty. He has one daughter, Jessica Bennett ("Jessie") Maltin, born in 1986, who works with him (his production company, JessieFilm, is named after his daughter)
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Crimean War
223,513  Ottoman Empire 45,400[2] 10,100 killed in action 10,800 died of wounds 24,500 died of disease French Empire 135,485[2] 8,490 killed in action; 11,750 died of wounds; 75,375 died of disease 39,870 wounded  British Empire 40,462[2] 2,755 killed in action 1,847 died of wounds 17,580 died of disease 18,280 wounded  Kingdom of Sardinia 2,166[2] 28 killed in action 2,138 died of disease 530,125[2] 35,671 killed in action 37,454 died of wounds 377,000 died from non-combat causes 80,000 wounded[3][4]v t eCrimean WarBalkansOltenița Sinop Cetate Calafat SilistraCaucasusKurekdere KarsNaval OperationsSuomenlinna Bomarsund PetropavlovskCrimeaAlma Sevastopol Balaclava Inkerman Eupatoria Taganrog Chernaya Malakoff Great Redan Kinburnv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russ
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Jack Allen (actor)
Jack Allen (23 October 1907 – 25 May 1995) was a British film, theatre and television actor. He made his stage debut in 1931 at the Liverpool Playhouse, appearing in The Swan and had a long theatrical career which lasted until 1980, when he appeared at the Old Vic in a production of The Merchant of Venice. He made his film debut in The Angelus (1937), while his most notable role was as Lieutenant Thomas Willoughby in the classic 1939 version of The Four Feathers directed by Zoltan Korda
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TV Guide
TV Guide
TV Guide
is a bi-weekly American magazine that provides television program listings information as well as television-related news, celebrity interviews and gossip, film reviews, crossword puzzles, and, in some issues, horoscopes
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AllMovie
AllMovie[2] (previously All Movie Guide) is an online guide service website with information about films, television programs, and screen actors.[3] As of 2013, AllMovie.com and the AllMovie
AllMovie
consumer brand are owned by All Media Network.[4]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Further information on AllMovie's history: All Media Network § History AllMovie
AllMovie
was founded by popular-culture archivist Michael Erlewine, who also founded AllMusic and AllGame. The AllMovie
AllMovie
database was licensed to tens of thousands of distributors and retailers for point-of-sale systems, websites and kiosks
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Splinters (1929 Film)
Splinters is a 1929 British musical comedy based on the stage revue Splinters. The revue tells the story of the origin of the concert party Splinters created by UK soldiers in France in 1915. The film was followed by two sequels, Splinters in the Navy
Splinters in the Navy
(1931) and Splinters in the Air (1937).[1][2] Cast[edit]Nelson Keys Sydney Howard as Doleful Soldier Lew Lake as Nobbler Hal Jones as Sergeant Reg Stone as Drag Artist Wilfred Temple Carroll Gibbons
Carroll Gibbons
as Himself, leading the HMV Orchestra Gus Aubrey as Drag Act George Baker Walter Glynne Sidney Grantham Clifford Heatherley as Sergeant MillerReferences[edit]^ "Splinters". silentera.con. Retrieved 26 January 2014.  ^ "Splinters (1929)". nytimes.com
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Second Boer War
British victory[3][4]Treaty of VereenigingTerritorial changes British administration over The Orange Free State
Orange Free State
and the Transvaal in accordance with the Treaty of VereenigingBelligerents United Kingdom Cape Colony Natal Colony Rhodesia[a] Canada India New Zealand Australia New So
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Bernard Lee
John Bernard Lee
Bernard Lee
(10 January 1908 – 16 January 1981), known as Bernard Lee, was an English actor, best known for his role as M in the first eleven Eon-produced James Bond
James Bond
films. Lee's film career spanned the years 1934 to 1979, though he had appeared on stage from the age of six. He was trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
in London. Lee appeared in over one hundred films, as well as on stage and in television dramatisations. He was known for his roles as authority figures, often playing military characters or policemen in films such as The Third Man, The Blue Lamp, The Battle of the River Plate, and Whistle Down the Wind
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Wolves (1930 Film)
Wolves is a 1930 British crime film directed by Albert de Courville and starring Charles Laughton, Dorothy Gish
Dorothy Gish
and Malcolm Keen. A woman is captured by a gang of criminals operating in the Arctic
Arctic
but the leader later helps her escape.[1] It was based on a play by Georges Toudouze. It was produced by Herbert Wilcox's British and Dominions Film Corporation, but filmed at the Blattner Studios whilst sound equipment was being installed at Wilcox's nearby Imperial Studios, and the sound was added after filming was completed.[2] It was Gish's first sound film, and was Laughton's second talkie (but his first sound drama), having completed a film of a musical variety performance earlier the same year. Of 57 minutes original duration, it was released in 1936 in a 37-minute version retitled "Wanted Men". Cast[edit] Charles Laughton
Charles Laughton
..
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Drama Film
In reference to film and television, drama is a genre of narrative fiction (or semi-fiction) intended to be more serious than humourous in tone.[1] Drama
Drama
of this kind is usually qualified with additional terms that specify its particular subgenre, such as "political drama", "legal drama", "historical period drama", "domestic drama", or "comedy-drama". These terms tend to indicate a particular setting or subject-matter, or else they qualify the otherwise serious tone of a drama with elements that encourage a broader range of moods. All forms of cinema or television that involve fictional stories are forms of drama in the broader sense if their storytelling is achieved by means of actors who represent (mimesis) characters
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UK
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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The Third Eye (1929 Film)
The Third Eye is a 1929 British silent crime film directed by Maclean Rogers and starring Dorothy Seacombe and Hayford Hobbs[2] As part of a plan to rob banks, a financier insists on installing new television technology in several branches. Cast[edit] Dorothy Seacombe as Marion Carstairs Ian Harding as Tom Kennedy Hayford Hobbs as Henry Fenton John F. Hamilton as Jim Carstairs Cameron Carr as Inspector Jean Jay as Flash Annie Beatrice Bell as Mrs. Carstairs Syd Ellery as Piggott Harry Worth as Commissioner Cosgrove Patrick Ludlow as Arthur Redfern Eric Wilton as Sir James WoodridgeReferences[edit]^ Low p.463 ^ http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/sift/title/53981External links[edit]The Third Eye on IMDbThis article related to a British film of the 1920s is a stub
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