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Kerryonians
The Kerryonians
Kerryonians
were alleged to be the second oldest criminal street gang in New York City[1] [2] but may have been the first gang in the city. The members were made up of recent Irish immigrants from County Kerry, Ireland. There was also a 19th century Philadelphia
Philadelphia
gang of the same name.[3] Beginning in the 1820s, the Kerryonians
Kerryonians
were part of the first wave of the early New York gangs, following behind the first and oldest gang in the city, the Forty Thieves, to occupy the Five Points area. The Kerryonians
Kerryonians
were particularly fond of targeting New Yorkers who were of British descent. The Kerryonians
Kerryonians
also fought a gang named the "Pelters".[4] They are most known however for disrupting British actor William Charles Macready's performance at Astor Place
Astor Place
around 1825
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George Catlin
George Catlin
George Catlin
(July 26, 1796 – December 23, 1872) was an American painter, author, and traveler, who specialized in portraits of Native Americans in the Old West. Travelling to the American West five times during the 1830s, Catlin was the first white man to depict Plains Indians in their native territory.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years2 Career2.1 William Clark 2.2 Indian Gallery 2.3 Other works3 Family 4 Legacy 5 In fiction 6 Gallery 7 Works by Catlin 8 See also 9 References 10 Sources 11 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] George Catlin
George Catlin
lithograph of Buffalo Harbor, 1825 George Catlin
George Catlin
was born in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. As a child growing up in Pennsylvania, Catlin had spent many hours hunting, fishing, and looking for American Indian artifacts
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Tammany Hall
Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City
New York City
political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society. It was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City
New York City
and New York State politics and helping immigrants, most notably the Irish, rise up in American politics from the 1790s to the 1960s
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Irish Mob
The Irish Mob is the oldest organized crime group in the United States, in existence since the early 19th century. Originating in Irish American
Irish American
street gangs of the 19th century—depicted in Herbert Asbury's 1928 book The Gangs of New York—the Irish Mob has appeared in most major U.S. cities, including Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, and Chicago. The Irish Mob also has a strong presence in Ireland; however, unlike in the United States, the group has only been present in Ireland from the 1960s and onwards
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American Mafia
The American Mafia[2][3][4] (commonly shortened to the Mafia
Mafia
or the Mob, though “the Mob" can refer to other organized crime groups) or Italian-American
Italian-American
Mafia,[2][3][4] is the highly organized Italian-American
Italian-American
criminal society
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Organized Crime
Organized crime
Organized crime
is a category of transnational, national, or local groupings of highly centralized enterprises run by criminals who intend to engage in illegal activity, most commonly for money and profit. Some criminal organizations, such as terrorist groups, are politically motivated. Sometimes criminal organizations force people to do business with them, such as when a gang extorts money from shopkeepers for so-called "protection".[1] Gangs may become disciplined enough to be considered organized. A criminal organization or gang can also be referred to as a mafia, mob, or crime syndicate; the network, subculture and community of criminals may be referred to as the underworld.[2] European sociologists (e.g
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Herbert Asbury
Herbert Asbury (September 1, 1889 – February 24, 1963) was an American journalist and writer best known for his books detailing crime during the 19th and early-20th centuries, such as Gem of the Prairie: An Informal History of the Chicago Underworld, The Barbary Coast: An Informal History of the San Francisco Underworld and The Gangs of New York. The Gangs of New York was later adapted for film as Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York (2002). However, the film adaptation of Gangs of New York was so loose that Gangs was nominated for "Best Original Screenplay" rather than as a screenplay adapted from another work.Contents1 Early life 2 H. L. Mencken
H. L. Mencken
and The American Mercury 3 Later career 4 Recent years 5 Bibliography 6 Filmography 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Astor Place
Coordinates: 40°43′47″N 73°59′29″W / 40.729861°N 73.991434°W / 40.729861; -73.991434 Astor Place
Astor Place
is a short, two-block street in NoHo/East Village, in the lower part of the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan. It runs from Broadway in the west, just below East 8th Street; through Lafayette Street, past Cooper Square
Cooper Square
and Fourth Avenue; and ends at Third Avenue, continuing as St. Mark's Place. It borders two plazas at the intersection with Cooper Square, Lafayette Street, Fourth Avenue, and Eighth Street – Alamo Plaza and Astor Place
Astor Place
Station Plaza
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William Charles Macready
William Charles Macready (3 March 1793 – 27 April 1873) was an English actor.Contents1 Life 2 Evaluation 3 Relatives 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingLife[edit] He was born in London
London
the son of William Macready
William Macready
the elder, and the actress Christina Ann Birch. Educated at Rugby School, it was his initial intention to go to University of Oxford, but in 1809 financial problems experienced by his father, the lessee of several provincial theatres, called him to share the responsibilities of theatrical management. On 7 June 1810 he made a successful first appearance as Romeo at Birmingham. Other Shakespearian parts followed, but a serious rupture between father and son resulted in the young man's departure for Bath in 1814
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British Descent
 United Kingdom 57,678,000[2] (British citizens of any race or ethnicity) British Overseas Territories 247,899[3] United States 40,234,652-72,065,000 1 678,000 2[4][5] Canada 12,134,745 1 609,000 4[6] Australia 9,031,100 1[7] 1,300,000 4[8] Hong Kong 3,400,000 3 4[9] New Zealand 2,425,278 1 217,000 4[10] South Africa 1,600,000 750,000 4[8][11] Chile 700,000 1[12] France 400,000 4[13] Ireland 291,000 4[8] Argentina 250,000 1[14] United Arab Emirates 240,000 2[15] Spain 236,669 4[16][17] Peru 150,000 1[18] Germany 115,000 2[19] Pakistan 79,447 4[20] Cyprus 59,000 2[19] Thailand 51,000 2[21]  Switzerland 45,000 2[22] Netherlands 44,000 2[22] Israel 44,000[23] Portugal 41,000 2[22] Sweden 39,989 2 China 36,0
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Robbery
Robbery
Robbery
is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear. According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.[1] Precise definitions of the offence may vary between jurisdictions. Robbery
Robbery
is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two. Under English law, most forms of theft are triable either way, whereas robbery is triable only on indictment
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Street Fighting
Street fighting
Street fighting
is hand-to-hand combat in public places, between individuals or groups of people.[1] Unlike sport fighting, a street fight might involve weapons, multiple opponents, and no rules. The venue is usually a public place (e.g. a street) and the fight sometimes results in serious injury or occasionally even death.[1] The main difference between street fighting and a self defense situation is that a street fight is avoidable, whereas a self-defense situation is not. The other main difference is that the fight is consensual between both parties. A typical situation might involve two men arguing in a bar, then one suggests stepping outside, where the fight commences
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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